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News to History

Exhibits

 

• Special Exhibits

• Upcoming Exhibits

The Birthplace

Helicopter
 
December 21, 2013 to March 2, 2014

Beginning on December 21, the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum will host  "News to History:  Selections from the Briscoe Center."

Through photojournalism this exhibition explores the dynamics between the media and our Presidents.  Photographers such as George Tames, Eric Draper and David Kennerly will be highlighted from the period of President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the current administration of President Barack Obama.  The 57 framed selected images come from the photographic archives of the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, at the University of Texas at Austin.

The images below are a sampling of what is included in the exhibit. For ongoing stories  on the photographers and fun facts, please visit us on FaceBook.

President Richard Nixon with press photographers, ca. 1969-1974.
Dirck Halstead

© Dirck Halstead

Dirck Halstead Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin


Surrounded by members of the press, President Gerald Ford answers questions about the pardon of Richard Nixon beforethe House Judiciary Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, October 17, 1974.
David Hume Kennerly

Notably, two photojournalists whose archives are part of the Briscoe Center’s collections are shown in the image: Dirck Halstead and Frank Johnston (above and to the left of Ford, respectively).

David Hume Kennerly Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

Members of the press photograph President Bill Clinton as he prepares for the final national television address of his administration, January 8, 2001.
Diana Walker

© Diana Walker

Diana H. Walker Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American Histor
yThe University of Texas at Austin

 

Vice Presidential hopeful Lyndon B. Johnson campaigns by train in Virginia during the 1960 presidential campaign, October 1960.
Bruce Roberts

© Bruce Roberts

Democrat Lyndon Baines Johnson became president after the assassination of John F. Kennedy in 1963. Prior to his tenure in the White House, Johnson represented Texas as both a U.S. Representative (1937-1949) and Senator
(1949-1961), serving six years as Senate Majority Leader.

Bruce Roberts Photographic Archive, e_br_0366
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

Republican presidential candidate Richard Nixon gives his trademark “V” salute at a California rally during his 1968 presidential campaign.
Dirck Halstead

© Dirck Halstead

Dirck Halstead Photographic Archive, e_dh_0992
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

A cross dangles from the neck of a soldier manning a machinegun near Khe Sanh, Vietnam, 1971.
David Hume Kennerly

© David Hume Kennerly

In 1972, David Kennerly’s photographs of the Vietnam War earned him a Pulitzer Prize,
the industry’s highest honor. In bestowing the award, the Pulitzer committee wrote that Kennerly’s photographs “captured the loneliness and desolation of war.” Kennerly later explained that it was down time, rather than combat, that often provided the best photographs, stating, “One of the things I discovered in covering several wars is that sometimes the best photos are on the edges of the action, rather than in it. This photograph, taken on Easter in Vietnam is a good example. When I saw the cross dangling from the soldier’s neck near Khe Sahn, I knew I had a good photo.” Soon after his inauguration in 1969, President Richard Nixon declared that his administration would work to end the Vietnam conflict and secure “peace with honor” for the United States and its ally, South Vietnam. However, it was only after Nixon’s resignation and the United States’ acceptance of the fall of South Vietnam that the country would end its involvement in the war.

David Hume Kennerly Photographic Archive, di_00548
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

President Gerald Ford departs from his home in Alexandria,
Virginia, bound for his new job at the White House, as Betty
Ford stands in their doorway, 1974.
David Hume Kennerly

Because of the Nixons’ sudden departure, the White House residence wasn’t immediately ready for the Fords’ arrival; the couple continued living in their home for several days after Ford became president.

David Hume Kennerly Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

Governor Ronald Reagan of California and President Gerald Ford meet in a suite at the Century Plaza Hotel before a black tie Republican fundraiser, October 31, 1974.
David Hume Kennerly

Two years after this meeting, Reagan challenged Ford for the Republican Party’s presidential nomination in a hard-fought primary campaign.

David Hume Kennerly Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austi
n

 

President Gerald Ford receives bad news during the NorthVietnamese conquest of South Vietnam, 1975.
David Hume Kennerly

The United States abandoned its Saigon embassy and evacuated remaining American personnel in April 1975.

David Hume Kennerly Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

Crowds gather in front of the National Archives during a Bicentennial parade in Washington, D.C., July 1976.
Wally McNamee

© Wally McNamee

Wally McNamee Photographic Archive,
e_wm_0581
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

President Jimmy Carter greets the crowd on Earth Day at Riverfront Park in Spokane, Washington, 1978. Environmental awareness increased during the 1970s. Carter was the first president to speak at an Earth Day rally.
Diana Walker

© Diana Walker

Diana H. Walker Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

President Jimmy Carter claps as Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat embraceafter signing the historic Camp David Accords, the first peace treaty between Israel and any of its Arab neighbors, September17, 1978.
Darryl Heikes

© Darryl Heikes

Darryl Heikes Photographs,
e_dlh_0015
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

“The Joke,” March 3, 1981.
Diana Walker

© Diana Walker

President Ronald Reagan, CBS news anchor Walter Cronkite, presidential aides Jim Brady and David Gergen, Attorney General Ed Meese, Vice President George H. W. Bush, White House Chief of Staff James Baker, andCBS producer Bud Benjamin share a hearty laugh at the White House after Cronkite’s last interview with the president. Reagan, a former television and film actor, served as governor of California from 1967 until 1975. As the Republican presidential candidate, he defeated incumbent Jimmy Carter in the 1980 election.

Diana H. Walker Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

“The Fireside Chat,” November 19, 1985.
David Hume Kennerly

© David Hume Kennerly

During their first summit meeting, President Ronald Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev held a historic “fireside chat” in Geneva, Switzerland. A key moment in Reagan’s engagement with the Soviet Union (which he previously dubbed an “evil empire”), the summit was widely considered a success.

David Hume Kennerly Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

President Ronald Reagan and wife Nancy attend a memorial service at the Johnson Space Center for astronauts lost in the Challenger space shuttle accident, Houston, Texas, January 31, 1986.
Diana Walker

© Diana Walker

Diana H. Walker Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

During a Thanksgiving visit to Saudi Arabia, President George H. W. Bush tosses souvenir tie clips and key rings to soldiers stationed in the country before the impending Gulf War,
November 1990.
Diana Walker


© Diana Walker

Diana H. Walker Photographic Archive, di_00410
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

Five presidents (President George H. W. Bush and former presidents Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, and Richard Nixon) at the dedication ceremony for the Reagan Presidential Library, November 4, 1991.
David Hume Kennerly

© David Hume Kennerly

David Hume Kennerly Photographic Archive,
di_08351
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

President George H. W. Bush plays horseshoes at Camp David with the President of the Soviet Union, Mikhail Gorbachev, June 1990.
David Valdez


President George H. W. Bush plays horseshoes with Queen Elizabeth II at Camp David, May 1991.


David Valdez

 

President-elect Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Hillary Clinton, ChelseaClinton, and Tipper Gore celebrate on stage in Little Rock, Arkansas, after the announcement of Clinton’s victory on election night, November 3, 1992.
PF Bentley

© PF Bentley

Clinton served as governor of Arkansas for nine years before his election to the presidency.

PF Bentley Photographic Archive,
e_pfb_0061
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

President Bill Clinton and President Boris Yeltsin of the Russian
Federation talk to the press after a summit meeting, October 23, 1995.
Diana Walke
r

© Diana Walker

Clinton later provided the backstory for Walker’s photograph: “This is when I’m howling. Yeltsin says to the press, ‘You think I’m ridiculous. You think we’re ridiculous. But you’re ridiculous!’ I was laughing so hard because Yeltsin loved a good laugh. And he was one of those politicians that could get away with saying something the rest of us could never say. Telling the American press and the world press they were ridiculous---he made them laugh about it, too. We were all laughing.”

Diana H. Walker Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

President Bill Clinton prepares to speak in front of an estimated
half million people at Independence Square in Accra, Ghana,
1998.
Diana Walker

© Diana Walker

During his trip to Africa, Clinton also met with victims of genocide in Rwanda and visited the Robben Island prison cell that once held Nelson Mandela.

Diana H. Walker Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin


Election night, November 8, 2000.
David Hume Kennerly

© David Hume Kennerly

At the governor’s mansion in Austin on election night, Governor George W. Bushand his wife, Laura Bush, watch presidential election returns in his race against then-Vice President Al Gore. Also pictured is Bush’s brother, Governor Jeb Bushof Florida; his father, former president George H. W. Bush; and vice-presidentialnominee Dick Cheney with his wife, Lynne Cheney. Due to highly contested election results, it would be five weeks before Bush delivered his victory speech. Bush served as Texas governor for five years (1995--2000) before ascending tothe presidency.

David Hume Kennerly Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

President George W. Bush speaks with Hurricane Katrina
survivor Patrick Wright during a walking tour of Biloxi,
Mississippi, September 2, 2005.
Eric Draper

After Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast and New Orleans in late
August 2005, the president faced heavy criticism for the government’s delayed
response to the disaster. The hurricane remains the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history to date.

Eric Draper Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

President George W. Bush awards veteran Lance Corporal John
Munoz Ramirez the Purple Heart as Ramirez’s parents look on,
July 3, 2008.
Eric Draper


Ramirez was recovering at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda,
Maryland. The same day, Bush also attended the ground breaking ceremony for the new Walter
Reed National Medical Center in Bethesda, a replacement for theaging Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

Eric Draper Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

President-elect Barack Obama and President George W. Bush
meet in the Oval Office after Obama’s election to the presidency,
November 10, 2008.
Eric Draper

Eric Draper Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

President-elect Barack Obama steps out to the podium to be
sworn in as the forty-fourth president of the United StatesJanuary 20, 2009.
Pete Souza

A former University of Chicago Law School lecturer, Obama served three terms as an Illinois state senator (1997-2004) and one partial term as a U.S. senator (2005-2008) before his successful 2008 presidential campaign against the Republican nominee, Senator John McCain.

Obama Inaugural Photograph Collection, di_08352
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

Occupy D.C. protestors remove signs and belongings before
police officers begin an eviction of the McPherson Square,
February 4, 2012.
Lucian Perkins

© Lucian Perkins/Facing Change

Known for its slogan “We are the 99%,” the Occupy movement staged protests against social and economic injustice through out the country in late 2011 and early 2012. At the time of the eviction, protestors had maintained a continuous presence in the square for over four months. President Obama commented on the movement in a November 2011 speech, stating, “A lot of the folks who have been down in New York and all across the country in the Occupy movement, there is a profound sense of frustration. There is a profound sense of frustration about the fact that the essence of the American Dream-which is if you work hard, if you stick to it, that you can make it-feels like that’s slipping away.”

Lucian Perkins Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

Protestors demonstrate outside the Supreme Court, March28, 2012.
Lucian Perkins

© Lucian Perkins/Facing Change

The protests occurred during the final arguments for National Federation of
Independent Business v. Sebelius, which contested the constitutionality of thePatient Protection and Affordable Care Act, known popularly as “Obamacare.” In a decision announced on June 28, 2012, the court upheld the act’s individual mandate to buy health insurance as a constitutional exercise of the power of Congress to levy taxes.

Lucian Perkins Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at Austin

 

Michelle and Barack Obama arrive at the Inaugural Ball,
January 21, 2013.
David Hume Kennerly


© David Hume Kennerly

David Hume Kennerly Photographic Archive
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History
The University of Texas at
Austin


 

 

For more information, contact us at 714-983-9120 or Nixon@nara.gov.

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